The problem of poor teacher performance that has plagued thestate’s public school systems is bound to become a good deal lessserious in the future. The state has initiated comprehensiveguidelines that oblige teachers to complete a number of requiredcred

Essay topics:

The problem of poor teacher performance that has plagued the

state’s public school systems is bound to become a good deal less

serious in the future. The state has initiated comprehensive

guidelines that oblige teachers to complete a number of required

credits in education and educational psychology at the graduate

level before being certified.

Write a response in which you examine the stated and/or unstated

assumptions of the argument. Be sure to explain how the argument depends

on these assumptions and what the implications are for the argument if the

assumptions prove unwarranted.

The argument that improved academic training, in the form of required credits in

education and psychology, will substantially alleviate the problem of poorly

performing teachers may seem logical at first glance. However, the author relies

on unsupported assumptions about what kind of development teachers need and

mechanisms for replacing poor teachers with newly certified teachers. Therefore,

the argument is fundamentally flawed and unconvincing.

First, the writer assumes that the required courses will produce better teachers.

In fact, the courses might be entirely irrelevant to the teachers’ failings. Suppose,

for example, that the main problem lies in cultural and linguistic misunderstandings

between teachers and students; graduate-level courses that do not address

these issues would be of little use in bridging these gaps and improving educational

outcomes. Furthermore, the writer assumes that poorly performing teachers have

not already taken these courses. If the state’s teachers have already undergone

such training but still fail to serve their students, then requiring them to take the

classes again is unlikely to address the problem. In fact, the writer establishes no

correlation between the teachers’ classroom performance and their academic

coursework.

Additionally, the writer provides no evidence that poorly performing teachers who

are already certified will either stop teaching or will undergo additional training. In

its current form, the argument implies that only teachers seeking certification,

who may or may not be teachers already in the system, will receive the specified

training. Furthermore, the author fails to establish a link between becoming

certified and actually being hired in the public school system. If school systems

have budget shortfalls and institute a hiring freeze, then newly certified teachers

may not enter classrooms for quite some time. Unless there is a way to transition

poor teachers out of the classroom and ensure teachers with proper training are

soon hired, the bright future the writer envisions may be decades away.

The notion that the specified coursework will create better teachers would be

strengthened by evidence that the training will address barriers to educating

students. For example, if a state with similar demographics had implemented

similar guidelines and then seen either improved learning as measured by

standardized tests or improved teaching as documented by teacher observations,

then one could conclude with more confidence that the guidelines should be

implemented in this state. Also, the author would be considerably more persuasive

if she showed that a plan is in place to either require all teachers to gain this

certification or terminate poor performers without the certification. The author

should also demonstrate that the public schools have the budgets to hire newly

certified teachers so they can begin to have an effect on students.

In conclusion, the writer is not necessarily mistaken in stating that the state’s

comprehensive guidelines will lead to improvement in educational outcomes in

public schools. After all, the additional training would probably not adversely

affect classroom performance. However, to support the assertion that the

guidelines will effectively solve the state’s problem, the writer must first define

the scope of the problem more clearly and submit more conclusive evidence that

the new requirements will, in fact, improve overall teaching performance. Without

such evidence, stakeholders in the public school system, including parents,

administrators, and legislators, should be skeptical that education will improve

anytime soon.

Votes
Average: 6.9 (3 votes)
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Comments

Grammar and spelling errors:
Line 5, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Performing
...ially alleviate the problem of poorly performing teachers may seem logical at first glan...
^^^^^^^^^^
Line 9, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Mechanisms
...kind of development teachers need and mechanisms for replacing poor teachers with newly ...
^^^^^^^^^^
Line 23, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Outcomes
... these gaps and improving educational outcomes. Furthermore, the writer assumes that p...
^^^^^^^^
Line 25, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Not
... that poorly performing teachers have not already taken these courses. If the sta...
^^^
Line 29, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Classes
...ents, then requiring them to take the classes again is unlikely to address the proble...
^^^^^^^
Line 33, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Coursework
...ssroom performance and their academic coursework. Additionally, the writer provides no...
^^^^^^^^^^
Line 37, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Are
...e that poorly performing teachers who are already certified will either stop teac...
^^^
Line 43, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Training
...he system, will receive the specified training. Furthermore, the author fails to estab...
^^^^^^^^
Line 45, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Certified
... to establish a link between becoming certified and actually being hired in the public ...
^^^^^^^^^
Line 45, column 65, Rule ID: SENTENCE_FRAGMENT[1]
Message: “If” at the beginning of a sentence requires a 2nd clause. Maybe a comma, question or exclamation mark is missing, or the sentence is incomplete and should be joined with the following sentence.
...eing hired in the public school system. If school systems have budget shortfalls...
^^
Line 49, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: May
...freeze, then newly certified teachers may not enter classrooms for quite some tim...
^^^
Line 49, column 47, Rule ID: SENTENCE_FRAGMENT[1]
Message: “Unless” at the beginning of a sentence requires a 2nd clause. Maybe a comma, question or exclamation mark is missing, or the sentence is incomplete and should be joined with the following sentence.
...t enter classrooms for quite some time. Unless there is a way to transition poor tea...
^^^^^^
Line 53, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Soon
...ure teachers with proper training are soon hired, the bright future the writer env...
^^^^
Line 59, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Students
...ng will address barriers to educating students. For example, if a state with similar d...
^^^^^^^^
Line 67, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Implemented
...fidence that the guidelines should be implemented in this state. Also, the author would b...
^^^^^^^^^^^
Line 71, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Certification
...her require all teachers to gain this certification or terminate poor performers without th...
^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Line 75, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Certified
...chools have the budgets to hire newly certified teachers so they can begin to have an e...
^^^^^^^^^
Line 81, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Public
...mprovement in educational outcomes in public schools. After all, the additional trai...
^^^^^^
Line 83, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Affect
...training would probably not adversely affect classroom performance. However, to supp...
^^^^^^
Line 89, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: The
... submit more conclusive evidence that the new requirements will, in fact, improve...
^^^
Line 95, column 1, Rule ID: UPPERCASE_SENTENCE_START
Message: This sentence does not start with an uppercase letter
Suggestion: Anytime
...skeptical that education will improve anytime soon.
^^^^^^^

Transition Words or Phrases used:
actually, also, but, first, furthermore, however, if, may, so, still, then, therefore, after all, for example, in conclusion, in fact, kind of

Attributes: Values AverageValues Percentages(Values/AverageValues)% => Comments

Performance on Part of Speech:
To be verbs : 16.0 19.6327345309 81% => OK
Auxiliary verbs: 28.0 12.9520958084 216% => Less auxiliary verb wanted.
Conjunction : 18.0 11.1786427146 161% => OK
Relative clauses : 18.0 13.6137724551 132% => OK
Pronoun: 27.0 28.8173652695 94% => OK
Preposition: 53.0 55.5748502994 95% => OK
Nominalization: 21.0 16.3942115768 128% => OK

Performance on vocabulary words:
No of characters: 3290.0 2260.96107784 146% => OK
No of words: 544.0 441.139720559 123% => OK
Chars per words: 6.04779411765 5.12650576532 118% => OK
Fourth root words length: 4.82947280553 4.56307096286 106% => OK
Word Length SD: 3.07046214015 2.78398813304 110% => OK
Unique words: 273.0 204.123752495 134% => OK
Unique words percentage: 0.501838235294 0.468620217663 107% => OK
syllable_count: 953.1 705.55239521 135% => OK
avg_syllables_per_word: 1.8 1.59920159681 113% => OK

A sentence (or a clause, phrase) starts by:
Pronoun: 3.0 4.96107784431 60% => OK
Article: 19.0 8.76447105788 217% => Less articles wanted as sentence beginning.
Subordination: 6.0 2.70958083832 221% => Less adverbial clause wanted.
Conjunction: 1.0 1.67365269461 60% => OK
Preposition: 11.0 4.22255489022 261% => Less preposition wanted as sentence beginnings.

Performance on sentences:
How many sentences: 22.0 19.7664670659 111% => OK
Sentence length: 24.0 22.8473053892 105% => OK
Sentence length SD: 65.4018253593 57.8364921388 113% => OK
Chars per sentence: 149.545454545 119.503703932 125% => OK
Words per sentence: 24.7272727273 23.324526521 106% => OK
Discourse Markers: 6.45454545455 5.70786347227 113% => OK
Paragraphs: 46.0 5.15768463074 892% => Less paragraphs wanted.
Language errors: 21.0 5.25449101796 400% => Less language errors wanted.
Sentences with positive sentiment : 11.0 8.20758483034 134% => OK
Sentences with negative sentiment : 9.0 6.88822355289 131% => OK
Sentences with neutral sentiment: 2.0 4.67664670659 43% => OK
What are sentences with positive/Negative/neutral sentiment?

Coherence and Cohesion:
Essay topic to essay body coherence: 0.246095615851 0.218282227539 113% => OK
Sentence topic coherence: 0.0849100087681 0.0743258471296 114% => OK
Sentence topic coherence SD: 0.0407877156656 0.0701772020484 58% => OK
Paragraph topic coherence: 0.0600094490912 0.128457276422 47% => OK
Paragraph topic coherence SD: 0.055048239069 0.0628817314937 88% => OK

Essay readability:
automated_readability_index: 19.4 14.3799401198 135% => OK
flesch_reading_ease: 30.2 48.3550499002 62% => OK
smog_index: 11.2 7.1628742515 156% => OK
flesch_kincaid_grade: 15.0 12.197005988 123% => OK
coleman_liau_index: 18.11 12.5979740519 144% => OK
dale_chall_readability_score: 9.3 8.32208582834 112% => OK
difficult_words: 154.0 98.500998004 156% => OK
linsear_write_formula: 10.5 12.3882235529 85% => OK
gunning_fog: 11.6 11.1389221557 104% => OK
text_standard: 12.0 11.9071856287 101% => OK
What are above readability scores?

---------------------
Maximum six paragraphs wanted.

Rates: 66.67 out of 100
Scores by essay e-grader: 4.0 Out of 6
---------------------
Note: the e-grader does NOT examine the meaning of words and ideas. VIP users will receive further evaluations by advanced module of e-grader and human graders.

Attribute Value Ideal
Final score: 4.0 out of 6
Category: Satisfactory Excellent
No. of Grammatical Errors: 0 2
No. of Spelling Errors: 0 2
No. of Sentences: 64 15
No. of Words: 544 350
No. of Characters: 3067 1500
No. of Different Words: 255 200
Fourth Root of Number of Words: 4.829 4.7
Average Word Length: 5.638 4.6
Word Length SD: 2.915 2.4
No. of Words greater than 5 chars: 260 100
No. of Words greater than 6 chars: 208 80
No. of Words greater than 7 chars: 151 40
No. of Words greater than 8 chars: 88 20
Use of Passive Voice (%): 0 0
Avg. Sentence Length: 8.5 21.0
Sentence Length SD: 4.279 7.5
Use of Discourse Markers (%): 0.469 0.12
Sentence-Text Coherence: 0.198 0.35
Sentence-Para Coherence: 0.84 0.50
Sentence-Sentence Coherence: 0.054 0.07
Number of Paragraphs: 48 5